Be Smart When Shopping for Sewing Supplies

sewing supplies collage

Stores that sell fabrics and other sewing supplies are constantly trying to attract your business. This is good for you as a consumer. The fact that there is so much competition in this industry means that the prices will be very competitive. However, you still need to be cautious as you are shopping for your sewing supplies. Do not buy all of your supplies from the first store that you come across. That would be a mistake that could potentially cause you to pay much more money than you need to. You should spend some time carefully investigating the various stores that sell all of the items that you are interested in. Here are some tips that you can use when you need to buy some sewing supplies.

1. Find a store that offers frequent discounts.

There are sewing supply stores that frequently discount many of the items they have in stock. They might do this to clear out some of their older inventory. They also frequently mark down items as a way of attracting new customers to their store. Whatever the case may be, you need to make a point of finding out which sewing supply stores discount their inventory more than their competitors. Then you will need to check back with that store frequently to see if they have marked down any items that you need. You need to stay on top of things because the best items are sure to sell out shortly after they are discounted.

2. Search online to learn about the newest products.


Online articles are written by professionals and regular people on a wide variety of topics. The sewing supply industry is no exception. One of the best and easiest ways for you to get the most current info regarding the latest products that are related to sewing is to frequently read online articles. There are some outstanding sewing sites that have been around for a very long time. They have many knowledgeable contributors who are constantly writing posts about new and exciting products in the sewing industry. Suppliers like Paccana are constantly adding new items to their inventory. It is always helpful to stay updated about what these new items are. However, these sewing sites tend to vary greatly in terms of their quality. You need to find out which ones are the most popular. You should also make sure that you only read articles on sites that are updated regularly.

3. Talk to people who are knowledgeable about sewing supplies.

You might think that you know a lot about which sewing supplies are the best. However, there will always be someone out there who knows more than you or me. This is why we need to seek out these people in order to learn as much as we can. There is no shame in seeking guidance from people who have been buying sewing supplies and fabrics for longer than you have. Go to companies that need to purchase sewing supplies on a regular basis. Find out what their criteria is for the materials they purchase. Why do they choose certain brands over others? What type of results should you expect if you buy products made by a specific company? Get their reviews of as many different sewing supply companies as you can. The more research you do, the more money you can save on sewing supplies. 

Diabetes Supply Case: A New Sewing Project

I have been wanting to make a pretty bag for a diabetes supply case for quite some time. The problem has been that I could not find a pattern for what I wanted. So, after exhausting all the searches on Google, I decided to just try to make one. This version needs some work. It is NOT perfect, but it still looks better than the plain old drab black case that is standard issue for glucose meters.It is pretty close to my vision for what I wanted to make, but I am not satisfied with it. However, it is a good starting place. It just looks all wonky. 

diabetes supply case

My first draft for a diabetes suppy case

I wanted a bag that I could take with me when we go out to eat, or when we travel. I thought for a long time about what needed to be in it. 

  • a place to hold ice, to keep my insulin cool
  • a place to put the insulin
  • a place to hold the glucose meter, lancette device, a pen, test strips
  • a pocket for insulin syringes
  • a pocket for used supplies (so I can dispose of them when I get home)
diabetes supply case

The zipper part turned out pretty good, but need a longer oner.

Then I thought about what else I wanted to be in it:

  • Slots for debit card, insurance card, driver’s license 
  • A zippered pocket on the outside
  • A place to hold credit cards
  • A place for a food/blood sugar diary
  • A travel size Beano (I take them at every meal to reduce the amount of gas discharged into my colostomy bag.)
diabetes supply case

The inside of the bag.


When the case is opened up, the first thing you see on the left is the pocket with credit card slots. I have six slots. These are holding a debit card, some alcohol swabs, and some business cards. On the right is a see through (clear vinyl) pocket to hold used syringes until I can get home and put them in a Bio-Hazard container. 

diabetes supply case

Insulated, vinyl lined removable pouch for ice pack for insulin.

When you turn over the clear pocket, the removable insulated vinyl lined pouch for an ice pack is located under it. There are hook and loop strips on the case and pouch to help keep it in place. I can put my insulin vials inside the pouch and zip it shut, where they will stay cold all day. Then, if we are traveling, I can remove the pouch, put the insulin in the hotel refrigerator, and the pouch of ice in the freezer section. It will refreeze overnight and I will be ready for the next day of travel or sightseeing fun. 

The removable ice pack is easy to take out and put back in.

The removable ice pack is easy to take out and put back in.

Just another view of the removable ice pack. It stays in really well with the hook and loop strips. 

Credit card slots

Credit card slots

The pocket for credit card slots needs to be improved a bit. This one is divided into six slots. I can put my driver’s license and a debit card in there, and not have to take my purse with me everywhere. I think that is a big plus. 

diabetes supply case

The glucose meter and test strips.

Turn over the credit card slots, and there are the glucose meter, test strips, an empty test strip container to store used strips until I can get home and dispose of them in a bio-hazard container, my lancet device, and ink pen, and my Beano. These look a little wonky too, but remember, I did not have a pattern, and I was making this up as I went along. 

diabetes supply case

Pocket for new insulin syringes

On the underside of the credit card slot pocket, is another pocket for my new insulin syringes. This pocket is big enough to hold a bag of ten syringes. I can keep other syringes in my suitcase until they are needed. 

case 09

This is not really bad for a prototype.

This case is not finished. It needs to have some bias tape to cover the raw edges (I did not have any gray or pink on hand), and a couple of other little tweaks, but all in all, it is not bad for a first version. I am going to add a cross body strap to it too. When we get home from our vacation, I am going to make another one, and do a tutorial post on how to make it. I am also going to try to make a pattern for it. It will have some optional features, because not everyone needs the same supplies. 

So, what do you think of my Diabetes Supply Case? What would you want in yours that is not in this one? What would you leave out? 

Making a Toiletry Bag For My Next Trip

My new Toiletry Bag

My new Toiletry Bag

I’m headed out on a trip soon, and I wanted to make a simple cosmetic bag for myself. The one I have is about twenty or so years old and I just wanted a new one. I looked and looked online and googled looking for a pattern to use or a tutorial. I finally found a cute pattern on Etsy. I got my prettiest fabric and a pretty pink zipper, and started making the bag. It was soon apparent that pattern creator had left something out. I couldn’t figure out what was wrong with it, but I will say that it was a complete waste of my money for the pattern, my nice pretty fabric, and my pink zipper. I had to go to plan B, which was asking in a sewing group on Facebook what tutorial or pattern the sewists there use for making a boxy cosmetic bag. True to the nature of people with like interests in groups, I soon had several links to follow and finally found a free tutorial that I liked. 

I love this fabric

I love this fabric

I used the tutorial from Sew Like My Mom, but made a couple of changes to it along the way. I did not have any laminated fabric to use, and I was able to salvage the handle from the previous hot mess that was thrown into the trash bag. As I have no sewn much since my surgery in 2012, I am a bit out of practice. I messed up this bag too, by inserting the zipper upside down. I was so ready to quit and forget about a new bag, but I decided I could save this project, for at least the trip coming up, by threading a piece of ribbon through the zipper pull so I can open and close the bag. That’s what I did, and was able to save the project. 

Lined with woodgrain gray fabric

Lined with woodgrain gray fabric

I also quilted my bag by sandwiching the lining, the batting, and the outer fabric, and stitching them together before cutting it down to 14.5 X 20 inches. It’s a bit smaller than the tutorial called for, but it is what it is. I am happy with the size of it. 

My toiletry bag

My toiletry bag


When I get back from my trip, I will try making some more of these, and get the zippers in right. It really is a cute bag, and a good size for holding all your things you need in your carry on bag. What do you think of my bag? 

This Grandma Will Cut You! Cricut You, That Is.

This post contains affiliate links.

cricut iron ons

The Princess Amelia T-Shirt

A couple of years ago, I won a Cricut Explore ™ in an online giveaway. I sat in my closet in the box it came in for over a year. Then last summer, my daughter, Emily came over and we played around with the Cricut again, trying to make some things for her scrapbooking. It took us a couple of days to figure it out, but we finally got two scrapbook pages out of the machine, and then it sat around in my craft room for another few months. This month, I finally got around to playing with the Cricut again, and I wanted to show you what I have made with it so far. 

The photo above is a glitter iron on. It took me a couple of tries to get it right, because you have to remember to check a box to “mirror” for iron ons. Here is Amelia showing off her new T-shrit made for her by me:

Such a little ham! But cute as can be.

Such a little ham! But cute as can be.

And one more:

Amelia in her glitter princess t-shirt

Amelia in her glitter princess t-shirt

Owen's Helicopter T-shirt.

Owen’s Helicopter T-shirt.


Next, I made Owen a T-shirt with a iron on helicopter. That boy is obsessed with helicopters. Well, with anything with a blade, like fans. He is not as into the photo taking as his little sister, so his Mummy had to catch him on the run to get this photo for meYou can tell he did not want his picture taken. That big foot didn’t hide that helicopter though! Thanks for taking the picture for me, Sarah. 

The last thing I did was a Peppa Pig iron on for Parker. At three, he is in LOVE with Peppa Pig. I searched the internet for a free SVG file, to no avail. I had to pay for the file on Etsy, just in case you see and go trying to find a file to use for yourself. And if you do buy this particular file on Etsy, note that once you click to check the box to mirror the first cut, it shows all the rest of the cuts as checked to mirro as well. Only they don’t. You have to “cancel the cut” in between each piece, then “go” again to cut the next piece, check the “mirror” box, and cut. And do it all over again for each of the 8 screens. I WAS a pain in the rear, but I finally got through it before I used up all my vinyl with wasted cuts. This iron on has about a hundred gazillion teeny tiny pieces, so a pair of tweezers was a really handy piece of equipment. It turned out really great and I am so proud of it! 

My finished Peppa Pig iron on for Parker

My finished Peppa Pig iron on for Parker

I haven’t seen Parker since I finished this, so he doesn’t have it yet. Therefore, I have no picture of it with him wearing it. I’ll come back later when I get a pic and update here. I also made a pair of shorts with some Peppa Pig fabric I found in a fabric selling group on Facebook. I thought I had a boys shorts pattern, but I did not. I DID have a pattern for a pair of pajamas that included a short version so I used that, and the slash pocket piece from a different pattern, to make these shorts with side pockets. Because, you know, boys need pockets for all their stuff. 

The new outfit I made for Parker.

The new outfit I made for Parker.

I can’t wait to see his face when I give it to him! 

What have you made this week? Do you have a Cricut? What do you use it for? Did you work on any sewing or crafting projects? I’d love to hear about them. 

Joann Fabrics Turkey Tablescapes #turkeytablescapes

Thanksgiving is not only eating turkey and dressing and watching football games. For us in the Fab Household, it is also about crafts and making the table look good. This month, I decided to make three crafts: An easy one, an intermediate one, and an advanced one. See if you can guess which is which!

The first thing I made was a round tablecloth for my Thanksgiving Day table. I picked out a fabric that looked like fall:

Cranston VIP fabric from Joann Fabrics

Cranston VIP fabric from Joann Fabrics

I bought three yards of this Cranston VIP fabric from Joann. To cut the fabric, here is a graphic that shows how to:

How to cut fabric for a round tablecloth

How to cut fabric for a round tablecloth


When you get through cutting the fabric, you will have one piece that measures 72: X 44″; 2 pieces that measure 36″ X 11 inches; and 4 pieces that measure 18″ X 11″.

To put these pieces together, take one 36″ X 11″ pieces and 2 18″ X 11″ pieces, and sew one of the 18″ pieces to each end of the 36″ piece, right sides together, using a 1/2 inch seam. . Repeat with the other 36″X11″ piece and the other two 18″ X 11″ pieces. Press seams open.  You will now have two pieces that measure about 71″ X 11″.

Find the center of the 71″ X 11″ pieces and mark it in the seam, so that you can match it to the center of the 72″ X 44″ piece. Pin the long edge of one 71″ X 11″ piece to the long edge of the 72″ X 44″ piece, right sides together, matching centers. Stitch together using a 1/2 inch seam. Press seam open. Repeat with the other 71″ X 11″ piece on the other side of the 72″ X 44″ piece.

Now that you have sewn all the pieces together, you will have a large almost square piece. Fold in half, then fold in half again n the bias. Lay this out flat on the floor or other large surface.

Cut the open end of the fabric in a curve.

Cut the open end of the fabric in a curve like this.

Cut the wide end of the folded fabric in a curve, like the one shown above, as close to the edge of the fabric as you can. When the fabric is unfolded, it will be a circle. Press under 1/4 inch around the entire circle. Stitch. Press under 1/4 inch again, stitch. Your round tablecloth will be complete.

My round tablecloth completed.

My round tablecloth completed.

Once my round tablecloth was completed, I felt like it needed some new cloth napkins to go with it. So, I made some using some solid dark burdundy Kona Cotton fabric from Joann Fabrics. These were a lot easier to make than the tablecloth. Just cut out a square the size you want, and stitch a rolled hem all the way around. Cut. Sew. Done. If you want to know how big to cut them I would say use a 22″ square for each one. A yard of fabric will make 4 napkins that size. The ones I made are just a bit too small, and I cut them 16″ square.

The burgundy fabric I used for my napkins.

The burgundy fabric I used for my napkins.

And then….after I made my napkins, I decided that I needed a nice set of napkin rings to use with them. To make my napkin ring, I cut a piece of 3/8 inch burgundy grosgrain ribbon 18″ long. I strung a 16mm bead on the ribbon and centered it in the middle of the 18″ length. Then, I threaded the ends through the bead again, and tied a knot. I added another bead on side of the ribbon, then threaded the other side of the ribbon through the second bead until it was tight against the knot of the first bead. I continued adding beads in this manner until I had six beads strung. I tied a knot, then strung the ends of the thread through the first bead, and pulled it tight. When this was done, I tied a bow, leaving the ends of the ribbon. Here is what my napkin rings look like”

My napkin rings

My napkin rings

Now that my tablecloth, napkins, and napkin rings are done, I can hardly wait for Thanksgiving day to get here! I had fun making them, and I hope that my family and friends like them too.

You can make so many pretty things with supplies, fabric, and crafting materials found in the Joann Craft Catalog.

And, you can save money too, with the 50% off one item coupon below. It is valid until Nov 30, 2013, either in the store or online.

Print and take to the store

Print and take to the store or use the code for online shopping.

What are you going to be making?

 

 

Waverizing My Bathroom With Jo-ann Fabrics #WaverizeIt

I received two yards of Waverly Fabric from Jo-ann Fabrics to make a project for this post.

You all know how I love to sew, so it was an easy answer when Jo-ann Fabrics asked me if I wanted to take the Waverize It Challenge the program for Waverly Fabrics to help promote the Jo-Ann and Waverly Facebook Contest.

#waverize


I decided to #Waverize my bathroom. I have needed a shelf for storage in there since we moved in. I measured the area above my toilet, then went to the local building supply place to get a 1″X6″ board, and asked them to cut it into 18″ pieces for me. I wound up with three 1″X6″X18″ boards to use for shelves in my finished project.

While I had many visions of this project in my head, it took me a long time to “dream it out” about how to put it together. This is how my project looks right now:

#waverize

Shelve for the bathroom

As you can see, it is not finished yet. I am having technical difficulties getting it to look the way I want it to look. I have never designed a 3-dimensional project before, and well, this is not working the way I wanted it to. It does, however, have potential to become the vision I have in my head. I may have to sit down and rip all the stitching out and start over, but I was running out of time for the deadline.

#waverize

Pretty! I was thinking of using these colors in my bathroom anyway

I am still trying to figure out how to get the top of the sides to not droop. I think maybe some extra stiff interfacing, or maybe a piece of a wire coat hanger. What would you do to stabilize it?

The top. I have one more piece to add for a hanging sleeve

The top. I have one more piece to add for a hanging sleeve

My original design was to have a hanging sleeve at the top, and hang the piece up using a curtain rod. However, since I have seen it on the wall using push pins to hold it there, it might be feasible to just use the push pins. Another idea I had was to use shower curtain hangers. What to do, what to do?

Don’t forget to head on over to the Jo-Ann and Waverly Facebook contest and help Waverly celebrate their 90th Anniversary by joining in the contest! You could win fabric and a gift card.