30 Minutes A Day Sewing Challenge

I wasn’t kidding when I challenged myself to make an effort to spend 30 minutes a day doing something sewing related. I haven’t sewn anything much to speak of since May of 2012. It has just been too painful for me to do. But then when I was thinking about it the other day, it came to me that I was working under the assumption that I HAD to finish a project if I sat down to do it, no matter how it made me feel. And that is where my 30 minutes a day challenge came from: I challenged myself to do 30 minutes and no more. When the timer goes off, I am done for the day, no matter where I am in the project. Doing this saves me from hurting myself, but allows me to do something again that I love to do.

Days 1, 2, and 3 of my personal challenge were spent cutting out patterns. You know how when you buy new patterns, all the pieces are on one big sheet of tissue paper, and have to be cut out before you can use them. I have always cut my patterns apart as soon as I buy them, so that when I do get in a sewing mood, I can get right to it. And I bought about 15 or so patterns the other day at Joann when they were on sale, so I have a lot of that to do. On this type of sewing related activity, I can actually spend a couple of hours sitting in my recliner doing it, and so I have only got six more patterns to cut.

I pinned Parker's quilt today

I pinned Parker’s quilt today

Today was Day 4. I spent my 30 minutes pinning Parker’s quilt. This quilt was actually stitched in November and December of 2011, and circumstances caused me to put it away unfinished. I have been wanting to pick it up and finish it for him ever since I got back to Georgia in November 2012, but I have not been able to. I think with my new attitude of doing something for 30 minutes, I may just get this finished before the end of March. Only a year and 2 months late, but I will finish it. And that is what matters.

All pinned

All pinned

My Personal National Craft Month Challenge: Do More For Me

I have been giving this a lot of thought, ever since I learned that March is National Craft Month. I know I am not the same physically as I used to be, and I may never be back to my whole self again. I struggle with that knowledge every single minute of every single day. I often walk into my sewing room and just sit in the chair for a few minutes. I look around me and see all my favorite things in there. My sewing machine. My trusty seam ripper (Yes, even though we have a love hate relationship, I still miss that old fool), all the lovely lovely fabric piles. And I make myself miserable when I do that.

A project for me--wall hanging organizer

A project for me–wall hanging organizer

 

Well, then this notion of National Craft Month came along, and I started thinking that maybe I could start with baby steps. Now, my idea of sewing is to get myself in the mode, cut out a hundred (okay, maybe 5 or 10) projects so that as soon as I finish one, I can pick up the next one and not lose momentum. And sit in that sewing room for hours on end, only coming out for nourishment and to use the bathroom. But then I thought that maybe, if I change my attitude and my modus operandi, I might be able to accomplish something in just thirty minutes a day. I have been in this thinking spree for a few days now. And then, I saw this post today. And I knew it was time for me set out on my journey up that damn mountain. If I never get out of the recliner and try, I will never make anything for sure.

a gift for Becca

a gift for Becca

I am going to start out with a goal of just thirty minutes a day. 30 minutes to cut, or pin, or stitch, or press, or whatever it is I need to do to MAKE SOMETHING. Or to FINISH SOMETHING. That is where part of my depression comes from: not being able to DO SOMETHING. So, I am going to start by just doing something for thirty minutes a day. I have a kitchen timer I can set, and when that thing dings, it’s like the end of the round in boxing–I’ll slink off to my recliner, my corner, and just rest for the remainder of the day.

I really don’t know what I will do first. I have so many things on my list, but the most pressing are these: Finish Parker’s quilt; finish Seth’s quilt; cut fabric for Emily’s quilt; make a circular needle case for Becca; make shirts for Parker, Spencer, Owen, and Michael; make a dress for Amelia; make an iPad cover for me. And many more things for Emily, Sarah and the other Sarah. It might take me all year to do this, but the end result will be a happier me.

I Have Some Crafts For Sale

I know this is the day you have all been waiting for: The day I post some crafts for sale. I have a bunch of stuff that I made before my surgery that I really need to get out of here. So, I am putting them out there to see if anyone wants to buy them. Here is what I have for today. I might list some more over the weekend, so if you don’t see something you like here, check back in a day or two.

If you want to buy one of these items, click on the Paypal button for that item to make a payment. The prices listed include shipping within the United States. If you are outside the United States, you can calculate shipping from Zip Code 30113 in Georgia. If you want a tracking number add $1 to the price.

If you want more pictures, just let me know and I can post some more. I have some more things that I  will be posting soon.



Baby Quilt $85

Baby Quilt $85




Messenger Bag for Laptop

Messenger Bag for Laptop $65




Green Apron (Large) $25

Green Apron (Large) $25




Hearts Chefs Apron $20

Hearts Chefs Apron $20




Blue Pieced Zip Bag $6

Blue Pieced Zip Bag $6

These little bags are great for keeping your purse organized


Orange Dot Zip Bag $6

Orange Dot Zip Bag $6

These little bags are great for keeping your purse organized


Pink Crocheted Baby Booties $6.00

Pink Crocheted Baby Booties $6.00


Green Crocheted Baby Booties $6.00

Green Crocheted Baby Booties $6.00

 


Crocheted Hat & Booties $14

Crocheted Hat & Booties $14



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Making A Wreath For Christmas: #Fabulouslyfestive

I was compensated for this post by Joann Fabric & Crafts

I gathered my supplies together first.

I gathered my supplies together first.

I had been thinking about what I was going to make for this month for quite some time, and finally decided it was going to be a Christmas Wreath for my front door. I don’t decorate a lot for the holidays, but  wreath at the door just makes everyone who comes to the door put a smile on their face.

Yesterday I was getting ready to start making the wreath, but I couldn’t find my hot glue gun. I have had that thing since probably 1985, and even though I haven’t used it in quite some time, I knew that I still have it. We hauled it around in our travel trailer for 13 years, and I know it was still in the wicker trunk when I unpacked it. Except that I couldn’t find it. It was not in any of the places I thought it might be. Fabgrandpa even helped me look for it. We looked in all of the boxes and bins that are stored on the back porch and in my office, but it is just not there. You know when I will find it, don’t you? When I buy a new one. It always works that way for me.

So, today I gathered all my supplies together, and started working on a revised version of the wreath that I was going to make, the version that does not use a hot glue gun. I needed a large piece of cardboard for the framework of the wreath. I had a shipping box on the back porch that was big enough to work with. There really isn’t a special size, just whatever size you like. The one I made is about 18″ around. So, here are the materials and tools you will need to make a wreath like the one I made:

Materials:

A large piece of stiff cardboard

packing tape

fabric glue

bubble wrap, about 4 yards or leftovers from packages received (I used a little of new and a little of recycled)

1 yard of 120″ wide fabric in a neutral color (I used ecru quilt backing fabric)

1 spool of 1/4″ wide ribbon (I used green)

15-21 1 inch jingle bells

Tools:

a large pot lid for marking a circle

a cereal bowl

a Sharpie marker

scissors for cutting the cardboard

5-7 safety pins

Cut out your cardboard

Cut out your cardboard

Place the pan lid on the cardboard and draw a circle around it with the sharpie marker. Then, use the cereal bowl to draw a smaller circle inside the larger one. Because I wanted my wreath to be wider than the pot lid circle, I used the first circle I drew as  guide to draw a larger circle outside of that line. Then, cut out the large circle, and cut out the small circle so I had a round piece of cardboard with  a hole in the middle.

Wrap the cardboard circle with bubble wrap pieces

Wrap the cardboard circle with bubble wrap pieces

Next, starting on the back of your cardboard, start wrapping the bubble wrap around and through the hole in the middle.  Overlap the edges of the bubble wrap so that all of the cardboard is covered. Begin and end each piece of wrap on the back side of the cardboard.

Wrap fabric around cardboard.

Wrap fabric around cardboard, fold raw edge under on last wrap on the front so it doesn’t show.

Next, Cut the fabric into pieces that are 12″ wide X width of fabric. You will have three pieces of fabric that are 12″ X 120″. Fold one piece of fabric in half so it is 6″ wide, and start wrapping the fabric around the cardboard over the bubble wrap. Start and end each piece on the back side of the cardboard. Use some fabric glue to attach the first piece of fabric to the bubble wrap. Make sure you over lap the fabric so that each round covers the raw edges of the previous round, and the folded edge is on top. Continue to add pieces of fabric in the same way until the entire bubble wrapped cardboard is covered. On the last wrap on the front of the wreath, fold the raw edge under about 1/2″ so that it doesn’t show on the finished wreath. Glue the end of the fabric to the back of the piece. I used packing tape to hold it in place until the glue dried.

All wrapped!

All wrapped!

At this point, you will have a shabby chic fabric wrapped wreath that looks puffy from the bubble wrap, like in the picture above. Now you can decorate your wreath any way you wish. I chose to add red jingle bells to mine.

Attach your ornaments to the wreath.

Attach your ornaments to the wreath.

This is where I had to improvise in making my wreath. I had intended to use different decorations on my wreath, but that depended on using a hot glue gun, which, as you know, I was not able to find. So, instead, I used these pretty little jingle bells. I strung three together on a piece of green ribbon, and attached them to the wreath with safety pins. I used a total of 18 jingle bells in six clusters, but you can use as few or as many as you like, spaced evenly around the wreath. I like the way it turned out, even if it wasn’t what I wanted to do at first. And this way, I can change the decorations on the wreath to fit another holiday if I want to.

Hanging on my door.

Hanging on my door.

This wreath turned really simple and easy to do. You can use your imagination to add other things to yours to make it as elegant or as simple as you want. I might add some leaves made of green fabric, glued to cardboard, and then glued to the wreath around the bell clusters.

Merry Christmas!

Merry Christmas!

Do you make any of your Christmas decorations? Do you keep them from one year to the next? If you would like some ideas for making your own house Fabulously Festive with Joann Fabric and Crafts, you can check out their online catalog. If you do decide to make your own, you can use this coupon to get 50% off any one regular priced item, either in-store or online, thru December 31, 2013.

Print or use to order online

Print or use to order online

 

Pinterest In Practice: Handprint Turkey Craft For Kids

I knew my grandsons, Spencer and Parker, would be coming over today so I looked for a cute craft we could do together. I found just the thing on Pinterest, pinned by Rachel from YellowTennessee. She homeschools her children, so she looks for things they can do for arts and crafts. Here is the cute Handprint Turkey that she pinned on her board,  Craft For Kids:

She used a canvas, paint, and diaper wipes to create her turkey with her daughter’s handprints and footprint.

I decided to use some pretty paper that I had that came from Joann Fabric & Crafts to make ours. This paper comes in a pad, with 48 sheets of printed cardstock. There are several designs to choose from in the pad, with some suitable for this project.

Spencer, who is eleven years old, is almost a little too old for this particular craft, but we wanted to make a keepsake using his handprints and Parker’s footprint. Spencer went first. I spread about five colors of poster paint on a paper plate, then he smooshed his hand down into the paint, and then onto the cardstock. We let it dry for about an hour while Parker was napping before we moved to the next step.

Spencer. Eleven going on twelve.

Spencer. Eleven going on twelve.

Parker is going on 10 months old, and is pretty hefty! I put the black poster paint on a paper plate, then it took two of use get the paint on his chubby little foot. As soon as he felt that paint, his little bottom lip poked out and he started to cry! We sure didn’t expect that to happen. Emily, my daughter, and I managed to get three prints done before he was done with it altogether. That was enough, though, to make one for me, one for Mommy, and one for Donna, the other grandmother.

Parker is getting to be a big boy!

Parker is getting to be a big boy!

As you can see, he was not happy with this game. I think our version turned out really good, and the fancy paper is a nice touch for a framable keepsake from these two brothers.

My Turkey Print

My Turkey Print

I like it.  What do you think?

Joann Fabrics Turkey Tablescapes #turkeytablescapes

Thanksgiving is not only eating turkey and dressing and watching football games. For us in the Fab Household, it is also about crafts and making the table look good. This month, I decided to make three crafts: An easy one, an intermediate one, and an advanced one. See if you can guess which is which!

The first thing I made was a round tablecloth for my Thanksgiving Day table. I picked out a fabric that looked like fall:

Cranston VIP fabric from Joann Fabrics

Cranston VIP fabric from Joann Fabrics

I bought three yards of this Cranston VIP fabric from Joann. To cut the fabric, here is a graphic that shows how to:

How to cut fabric for a round tablecloth

How to cut fabric for a round tablecloth

When you get through cutting the fabric, you will have one piece that measures 72: X 44″; 2 pieces that measure 36″ X 11 inches; and 4 pieces that measure 18″ X 11″.

To put these pieces together, take one 36″ X 11″ pieces and 2 18″ X 11″ pieces, and sew one of the 18″ pieces to each end of the 36″ piece, right sides together, using a 1/2 inch seam. . Repeat with the other 36″X11″ piece and the other two 18″ X 11″ pieces. Press seams open.  You will now have two pieces that measure about 71″ X 11″.

Find the center of the 71″ X 11″ pieces and mark it in the seam, so that you can match it to the center of the 72″ X 44″ piece. Pin the long edge of one 71″ X 11″ piece to the long edge of the 72″ X 44″ piece, right sides together, matching centers. Stitch together using a 1/2 inch seam. Press seam open. Repeat with the other 71″ X 11″ piece on the other side of the 72″ X 44″ piece.

Now that you have sewn all the pieces together, you will have a large almost square piece. Fold in half, then fold in half again n the bias. Lay this out flat on the floor or other large surface.

Cut the open end of the fabric in a curve.

Cut the open end of the fabric in a curve like this.

Cut the wide end of the folded fabric in a curve, like the one shown above, as close to the edge of the fabric as you can. When the fabric is unfolded, it will be a circle. Press under 1/4 inch around the entire circle. Stitch. Press under 1/4 inch again, stitch. Your round tablecloth will be complete.

My round tablecloth completed.

My round tablecloth completed.

Once my round tablecloth was completed, I felt like it needed some new cloth napkins to go with it. So, I made some using some solid dark burdundy Kona Cotton fabric from Joann Fabrics. These were a lot easier to make than the tablecloth. Just cut out a square the size you want, and stitch a rolled hem all the way around. Cut. Sew. Done. If you want to know how big to cut them I would say use a 22″ square for each one. A yard of fabric will make 4 napkins that size. The ones I made are just a bit too small, and I cut them 16″ square.

The burgundy fabric I used for my napkins.

The burgundy fabric I used for my napkins.

And then….after I made my napkins, I decided that I needed a nice set of napkin rings to use with them. To make my napkin ring, I cut a piece of 3/8 inch burgundy grosgrain ribbon 18″ long. I strung a 16mm bead on the ribbon and centered it in the middle of the 18″ length. Then, I threaded the ends through the bead again, and tied a knot. I added another bead on side of the ribbon, then threaded the other side of the ribbon through the second bead until it was tight against the knot of the first bead. I continued adding beads in this manner until I had six beads strung. I tied a knot, then strung the ends of the thread through the first bead, and pulled it tight. When this was done, I tied a bow, leaving the ends of the ribbon. Here is what my napkin rings look like”

My napkin rings

My napkin rings

Now that my tablecloth, napkins, and napkin rings are done, I can hardly wait for Thanksgiving day to get here! I had fun making them, and I hope that my family and friends like them too.

You can make so many pretty things with supplies, fabric, and crafting materials found in the Joann Craft Catalog.

And, you can save money too, with the 50% off one item coupon below. It is valid until Nov 30, 2013, either in the store or online.

Print and take to the store

Print and take to the store or use the code for online shopping.

What are you going to be making?

 

 

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